Attorney Dan Chammas Works With International Scope

In countries like Canada, Attorney Dan Chammas is especially cognizant of the use of terms, as Canadian ‘labor law’ refers to unionized work environments there, and the ‘employment law’ label is attached to non-unionized employees and their issues. Of such nuances are effective advocacy made, and Chammas is deeply informed in the employment laws and regulations of a variety of international countries where his clients have work relationships and where they do business. Chammas is also backed up by the depth of knowledge and experience at the law firm of Venable LLP, which brings its formidable team to bear on behalf of clients.

In China, the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Employment Contracts and the Labor Law of People’s Republic of China are the basic regulations of employer/employee relationships. The government controls the All China Federation of Trade Unions, the only labor union, and strikes are discouraged despite provision given for staging strikes and entering bargaining. In France, work weeks have come to be limited to 35 hours, and the minimum wage has also increased by 25%. French employers struggle within the strict limitations of labor laws there, and litigators like Dan Chammas find the challenges of dispute resolutions have an entirely different set of parameters in France. AT the other end of the spectrum, India’s labor regulations have been criticized for their unnecessary complexity, over the top flexibility and ancient origins. Iran’s employment practices do not comply with even basic conventions of the International Labor Organization regarding right to organize, collective bargaining or the abolition of child labor, and are still based in ancient precepts.

Mexican labor laws provide right to strike and organize in theory, but in practice independent unions find it impossible to organize in Mexico. Swedish workplace issues follow a unique model of self-regulation through labor market parties, setting working hours, minimum wage, right to overtime compensation and other regulations for workers. Civil standardization of labor laws in Switzerland basically renders all employees governed by one central set of regulations. The United Kingdom has expanded its employment law to suit the needs of its membership in the European Union and the demand for equality, and Statutes, Statutory Regulations and Case Law provide the main source of regulation of employer/employee relationships.

In the United States, experienced litigators like Dan Chammas must be familiar with the National Labor Relations Act, which guarantees the right to form unions and initiate collective bargaining and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act which prohibits employment discrimination based on age 40 or older. In addition, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits employment discrimination by both public and private employers, labor organizations, training programs and employment agencies on the basis of sex, age, or race.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labour_law