Dan Chammas – The Details of the New California Sick Leave Law

Dan Chammas is a skilled litigator with extensive experience defending companies against class action lawsuits, particularly those having to do with wage, hour, and consumer class actions. He is dedicated to his career, and he has represented a number of Fortune 500 companies, premier providers of goods and services across the country, entertainment studios, and small businesses with varying levels of employees. He has extensive experience in corporate law, and has resolved nearly every type of employment dispute, which includes wrongful termination, sexual harassment, and unpaid wages. He has a clear understanding of corporate law in the state of California, and he helps his clients any way he can.

Dan Chammas

Recently in the state of California, a new law has been passed that will require nonprofit organizations to provide employees with paid sick leave. The California Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014 will impose new paid sick leave requirements for the benefit of employees in the state, and all employers will have to comply. The new law is specific, and there are essential details that employers need to follow. Here are the important details of the new law in place.

The new law covers virtually all employers, which includes not for profit companies. It doesn’t matter the size of the company because the law doesn’t specifically exclude businesses or organizations under a certain number of employees. In fact, the number of exceptions to the law is very limited, and all employers need to review their sick leave policies in order to ensure they working in accordance with the new stipulations. The law also applies to nonprofit organizations that working outside the state, but have California employees.

Nonprofit organizations need to guarantee at least three paid sick days per year. Under the new law, all employees who have worked more than thirty days need to have one sick day per every thirty hours worked. Although sick leave needs to roll over for every new year, employers are allowed to limit the use of sick leave in a year to twenty-four hours, or three days of work. No carry over of sick leave is necessary if the employer provides three days at the start of each new year.

As the new law begins to have an impact, all employers have to provide written notice to their employees explaining the new regulations. Not only do they have to explain how the new law works, but they also have to explain how each employee has the right to use paid sick leave. This includes informing each employee that they also have the right to file a complaint if they feel their paid sick leave policies are in accordance with the new law.

Dan Chammas is well informed of the new law and its importance details. He makes sure that his corporate clients understand completely.